For Screen Readers: Joint Health and Wellbeing Board Strategy refresh 2019-2022

Note

This document has also been designed to be read in an easy read format. For an easy read document with accompanying pictures go to pdf version of the easy read Joint Health and Wellbeing Board Strategy

Contents

Section 1. Introduction

Section 2. Why have a Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategy?

Section 3. 2012 – 2019: The story so far…

Section 4. What difference have we already made in Suffolk?

Section 5. Looking ahead: 2019-2022

Section 6. The 4 Principles

Section 7. The 4 Priorities

Section 8. How are we going to turn this strategy into action?

Section 9. Our actions moving forward

Section 10. Measuring the results

 

Section 1. Introduction

Health and wellbeing are really important to people, their families and in building strong communities.

The World Health Organisation works to promote health and keep the world safe. They help people have good access to healthcare and are protected from health emergencies.

They describe Health and Wellbeing as:

Health: a state of complete physical, mental and social wellbeing, not just the absence of disease or illness.

Wellbeing: where everyone realises their potential, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and are able to make a contribution to their community.

 

Section 1. Introduction

To make progress towards these outcomes people and organisations need to work well together.

Suffolk’s Health and Wellbeing Board is a really important part of partnership working in Suffolk.

The vision of the Suffolk Health and Wellbeing Board is that:

“People in Suffolk live healthier, happier lives. We also want to narrow the differences in healthy deprived communities and those who are more affluent through greater improvements in more disadvantaged communities.”  

 

Section 1. Introduction

Suffolk’s Health and Wellbeing Board must encourage the NHS, local councils, the police, and other organisations to improve the lives of people in Suffolk.

The Board encourages partnership working to improve services for the people of Suffolk.

The Board also looks to improve things like deprivation, housing, education, crime and safety.

Suffolk’s Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategy for 2012–2022 sets the long-term plan for achieving our vision; improving health and wellbeing in Suffolk.

 

Section 1. Introduction

This update will help to guide our work over the next few years.

 

Section 2. Why have a Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategy?

In Suffolk there are lots of people interested in and engaged with the work of the Health and Wellbeing Board.

 

Section 2. Why have a Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategy?

Members

Clinical Commissioning Groups

Healthwatch Suffolk

District & Borough Councils

Public Health

Voluntary & Community Sector

Suffolk County Council

NHS England

Suffolk Police

 

Section 2. Why have a Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategy?

Good partnership working will be more important than ever in the next few years.

We know that relative deprivation in Suffolk is increasing, and has spread across the county, including in our rural communities.

Deprivation means you don’t or can’t have the essential things that help you live your life.

Relative deprivation is explained at the end of this document.

Life expectancy in Suffolk has increased over the last 10 years. This means more people are living longer.

 

Section 2. Why have a Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategy?

However, this increase has slowed. This means increases in life expectancy are not happening as quickly as in previous years.

Adults are spending less time in good health.

People staying healthier as they get older is really important.

People do not always get the best education.

 

Section 2. Why have a Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategy?

There are many more people on housing waiting lists. We are also not building enough affordable homes.

All of these things matter because they have a big impact on people’s health and wellbeing.

All of this means that we have to work really hard to improve health and wellbeing in Suffolk.

Our local health and social care services are still under pressure because of budget and funding cuts.

 

The role of the Health and Wellbeing Board

Building on the assets of local communities.

Making sure local projects are effective.

Creating strong partnerships.

Making sure 2 organisations are not doing the same thing independently.

Enabling partners to make joint decisions.

 

Health in all policies

The Board wants to use a Health in All Policies approach wherever possible.

This aims to improve everyone’s health by making sure that everyone is thinking about health. This includes people who are creating policies or services.

Working together means that we can make improvements to health and care services.

Reducing health inequalities by improving people’s mental and physical wellbeing are not things that can be done by one person, team or organisation.

Health inequalities are unfair, unacceptable and avoidable differences in the health of people or groups of people.

 

Section 3. Suffolk’s Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategy 2012 – 2019: The story so far…

The Health and Wellbeing Strategy helps the Health and Wellbeing Board keep on track to achieve its vision.

A lot has changed since 2012 when this Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategy for Suffolk was first written.

Although some things have changed, the vision of the Health and Wellbeing Board is still important.

 

Key changes since 2012

Joint working in health and care, which now includes Alliances.

2 Integrated Care Systems that cover Suffolk.

More information to help understand local issues.

Better ways of working with partner organisations.

Local Alliances includes NHS, local authority and voluntary sector organisations. The alliances’ ambition is to improve health, wellbeing and care for the areas they serve.

In an Integrated Care System NHS organisations, in partnership with local councils and others, take responsibility for managing resources and delivering NHS standards.

These changes mean it is important to keep the outcomes of the Health and Wellbeing Strategy up to date.

2013

The first Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategy was launched.

Outcome 1: Every child has the best start in life.

Outcome 2: Suffolk residents have access to a healthy environment and take responsibility for their own health and wellbeing.

Outcome 3: Older people in Suffolk have a good quality of life.

Outcome 4: People in Suffolk have the opportunity to improve their mental health and wellbeing.

 

2016 - 2019

Outcomes for 2016-2019

After conversations with the Health and Wellbeing Board and partners, our outcomes were changed for 2016-2019.

Outcome 2 changed to ‘Improving independent life for people with physical and learning disabilities.’

We also added 4 themes. These should be in all 4 of our outcomes:

Stonger communities.

Embedding prevention.

Addressing inequalities.

Health and care integration.

 

Section 4. What difference has the Health and Wellbeing Board already made in Suffolk?

It is important to know where the Health and Wellbeing Board has already made a difference.

Some key examples of progress over the last 3 years are:

Suffolk Better Care Fund.

This fund helps to plan for health and social care services working better together.

 

‘The Time is Now’ Prevention Strategy for Suffolk.

A way to reduce health and care demand in the next 5-10 years. This strategy is about helping people before they get ill and helping them to live healthier lives for longer.

Suffolk Suicide Prevention Strategy, ‘Suffolk Minds Matter’, focuses on mental health.

Focusing on mental health and what can be done to promote good mental health and emotional wellbeing, and reduce mental ill health in Suffolk.

Health and Housing focus, including ‘Warm Homes, Healthy People’

Suffolk’s ‘Warm Homes Healthy People’ is a project designed to help vulnerable individuals make their homes cheaper to heat.

Refresh of Pharmaceutical Needs Assessment

Helping us to understand the things people in Suffolk want and need from a pharmacy. This will help to plan better services in the future.

 

Section 5: Looking ahead: 2019-2022

To inform the refresh of the Strategy for 2019 to 2022, we have heard feedback from all Health and Wellbeing Board members.

The feedback was clear: we need to simplify how we talk about our outcomes and themes.

Members also said the Board needs to provide clear and regular updates to help drive the Strategy.

Members also said the Board had to provide more data and information.

A group was then formed from Health and Wellbeing Board Member organisations to write this strategy refresh.

A new model has been developed by this group for the 2019-2022 Strategy refresh.

The new model is made up of:

Strategy priorities

Strategy principles

Strategy governance (groups that feed into the board)

 

4 Principles. 4 Priorities.

For the health and wellbeing of

the people of Suffolk

This is a flat image

 

Section 6: The 4 Principles

The new model includes the themes we had before, but they are now the 4 principles. All Health and Wellbeing Board members should work towards these principles.

Prioritising Prevention

Prevention is key to reducing the risks of long term poor health and wellbeing.

There are 3 levels of prevention:

Primary prevention: improving health and preventing disease.

Secondary prevention: detecting conditions early.

Tertiary prevention: managing conditions well.

 

Reducing health inequalities

Health inequalities are unfair, unacceptable and avoidable differences in the health of people or groups of people.

Many health inequalities are connected to poverty and deprivation.

Poverty means not being able to heat your home, pay your rent, or buy the things you need. It means waking up every day being worried about money.

Deprivation means you don’t or can’t have the essential things that help you live your life.

Social mobility is also very low in Suffolk.

Social mobility is about making sure everyone has the opportunity to build a good life for themselves regardless of their family background.

We can help improve this by making sure people get a good education and gain skills.

We also need to focus on people who find it most difficult to get a job, such as people living with disabilities or long-term health conditions.

Giving children the best start in life can help improve social mobility.

 

Promoting stronger and resilient Communities

Stronger and resilient communities have the skills and knowledge to help people, families, and their communities.

Services can support people to look after themselves so that they stay as independent as possible.

Services will also encourage people to use the new opportunities offered by technology to keep well and keep their independence.

Suffolk needs to have caring and safe communities which help people to live well and think about their own wellbeing.

 

Working Well Together

There is lots of work going on across Suffolk, in different organisations and by different teams of people.

It is really important that this is all brought together to help people to work together easily, and do things that have positive impacts.

Working well together is the only way that complex issues can be tackled.

New ways of working include providing services at a more local level, so that services are able to understand local needs quicker.

 

Section 7. The 4 Priorities Our new model changes outcomes to priorities and will help guide the work of the Health and Wellbeing Board.

Our research tells us that:

Many people in Suffolk currently enjoy good health and wellbeing.

 

Key findings from the Suffolk Joint Strategic Needs Assessment

However, our research also tells us that:

Suffolk’s population is ageing. This is likely to increase local health and care need.

The number of years which people spend in good health in Suffolk is falling.

One in three of 11 year olds in Suffolk are overweight or obese.

Mental health issues in Suffolk are increasing.

The number of people living with dementia in Suffolk is expected to double in the next 15 years.

Many people with cancer in Suffolk are diagnosed very late in their disease.

 

Section 7. The 4 Priorities

These issues are challenging and it will take a lot of work to improve things.

However, this Strategy offers Suffolk partners a way to address some of those challenges.

The 4 priorities for the Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategy 2019 to 2022 are:

Every child in Suffolk to have the best start in life

People of working age in Suffolk are supported to optimise their health and wellbeing

Older people in Suffolk have a good quality of life

People in Suffolk have the opportunity to improve their mental health and wellbeing

 

Section 8. How are we going to turn this strategy into action?

To help with the work of the Health and Wellbeing Board, we have areas of focus in each priority.

 

Every child in Suffolk to have the best start in life

Areas of focus include:

Increase the number of children who are a healthy weight in Suffolk.

Support vulnerable children in Suffolk, including children whose parents have misused alcohol or drugs.

 

People of working age in Suffolk are supported to optimise their health and wellbeing

Areas of focus include:

Prevent heart disease in Suffolk, including supporting people to be healthy at work.

Diagnose cancer earlier in Suffolk so that outcomes improve.

 

Older people have good quality of life

Areas of focus include:

Reduce the impact of frailty on the lives of older people in Suffolk.

Make sure people in Suffolk are supported well at the end of their life.

People in Suffolk have the opportunity to improve their mental health and wellbeing

Areas of focus include:

Make sure people in Suffolk have access to good quality and effective mental health services when they need them.

Improve the mental health and emotional wellbeing of children and young people in Suffolk.

 

Building on existing action plans

We recognise that good work is already taking place in Suffolk in these areas.

Any gaps in current work programmes will be presented to the Board for action.

There are lots of local groups that will help us with our priorities.

A list of these groups can be found over the next few pages.

 

Every child in Suffolk to have the best start in life

Gangs and County Lines Senior Leadership Group Suffolk

Safeguarding Children Board

CCG Governing Bodies and Clinical Executives

Ipswich & East Suffolk and West Suffolk Alliances

Great Yarmouth and Waveney CCG Local Delivery Groups

Most Active County Board

Violence Against Women & Girls and Men & Boys Steering Group

Safer and Stronger Communities Board

 

People of working age in Suffolk are supported to optimise their health and wellbeing

Working Well for Suffolk Group

Suffolk and North East Essex prevention, diabetes and cancer workstreams

CCG Governing Bodies and Clinical Executives

Ipswich & East Suffolk and West Suffolk Alliances

Great Yarmouth and Waveney CCG Local Delivery Groups

Most Active County Board

Post-16 Skills Board

 

Older people have good quality of life

Community Resilience Steering Group

Suffolk Safeguarding Adults Board

CCG Governing Bodies and Clinical Executives

Ipswich & East Suffolk and West Suffolk Alliances

Great Yarmouth and Waveney CCG Local Delivery Groups

 

People in Suffolk have the opportunity to improve their mental health and wellbeing

Mentally Healthy Communities Board

Community Resilience Steering Group

CCG Governing Bodies and Clinical Executives

Ipswich & East Suffolk and West Suffolk Alliances

Great Yarmouth and Waveney CCG Local Delivery Groups

 

Other organisations and areas the Board links to

Suffolk Growth Programme Board

Suffolk Housing Board

Lowestoft Rising, Felixstowe Forward, Leiston Together and One Haverhill

Strategic Equality and Inclusion Board

Libraries, Museums and Arts Board Suffolk Commissioners Group

Norfolk and Suffolk Criminal Justice Board

Dementia Alliance

 

Other organisations and areas the Board links to

We are always looking for more groups that we can work with.

 

Section 9: Our actions moving forward

Links will be made with the key groups already working in each focus area.

Existing action plans and goals will be presented to the Board. The Board can then decide if more work needs to happen.

 

Measuring the results

In order to track progress, the action plans and ‘Priority on a Page’ format will be used.

The Priority on a Page templates include information on:

The scale and nature of the issues in Suffolk.

Priority actions for the Health and Wellbeing Board over the next 3 years.

Key points around the 4 Health and Wellbeing Strategy principles, making sure we are keeping track of our progress in these areas.

 

Measuring the results

Each priority will be reviewed by the Board every 6 months.

This will look at whether the actions are improving things or whether the Board needs to do things a bit differently.

 

Glossary for key terms

‘Health in All Policies’: A partnership approach to improving everyone’s health by making sure health is included in all decision making.

‘Joint Strategic Needs Assessment’: Local assessments of current and future health and social care needs.

‘Relative Deprivation’: How deprived an area is when compared to other areas.

‘Wider Determinants of Health’: A range of things that impact on people’s health. This could be to do with things like money or environment.

 

This document was translated into easy read by Thinklusive as part of the Suffolk Accessible Information Partnership.

It was made in co-production with members of the Suffolk Learning Disability Partnership.

To find out more visit: thinklusive.org

For more information:

www.healthysuffolk.org.uk

www.candohealthandcare.co.uk